The dating company

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The Bae name is being retired and its users will be streamlined into Tagged and its global dating pool.

Cofounded in 2013 by tech-savvy brothers Brian, 28, and Justin Gerrard, 30 and friend Jordan Kunzika, 22, a first-generation, Angolan-American, Bae grew out of a conversation that came up over a dinner for young entrepreneurs in NYC.

The rest of the revenue comes from advertising and non-dating revenue, which includes educational services such as the Princeton Review.

You’ve seen the digital-age versions of self-help gurus, the ones with official titles suggesting they’ve cracked the code of human compatibility. But the ones most likely to be telling you the truth are the ones that admit that their dating algorithms are also powerful marketing tools. The notion became a wonderful marketing tool–red meat for the media. ’ Then you go meet her and most of the time you put your head in your hands because she was so ugly–and she was thinking the same about you.” (This was the pre-Internet era, mind you, when computers had 12K of memory.

The company applied to list common stock on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the ticker symbol "MTCH." J. Match's filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission did not specify a price target.

Match said it generated 8 million in sales in 2014, up from 3 million the year before.

“Black male daters typically had to send 10 times the number of messages as their white counterparts to receive one response and black women were fetishized for their looks and flooded with inappropriate comments.”By combining their love of technology, serious smarts (the trio boasts degrees from Dartmouth, Harvard, and the University of Virginia) and a desire to fix the problem of dating bias, Bae was launched at Howard University in April 2014.

People of type A are compatible with people of type B. They speak at online-dating conferences, describe their unique matching approaches, and promote their books. EHarmony has refused to reveal its algorithm, Finkel said, and therefore the company should not advertise a scientific approach to matching until it can show, publicly, that its system works according to the standards of scientific rigor. Finkel spoke with imploring volume and speed, as if an elaborate show of authority might convert the crowd to his cause. For nearly 50 years, ever since computers were first used to help college kids hook up, people assumed, or hoped, that the fact of technology as mediator would mean not just .

In labs, they reproduce the conditions of relationships, study interactions, generate conclusions. They write personality-profiling tests, tweak the algorithms. You can read about The Duet® Total Compatibility System in her book, . Eli Finkel (Northwestern University), Schwartz’s younger colleague in the behavioral sciences, who staked out his own territory as industry-scold, denouncing e Harmony, one of the largest dating sites in the world and the first to market a scientific approach to matching.

It brought in net earnings of 8 million in 2014, an increase from 7 million in the prior year.

The company reports it had 59 million monthly active users across its 45 brands as of the end of the third quarter. Match touts its shift to mobile platforms, especially through the popular app Tinder.

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